SHARK FIN SOUP DINNER

A brief summary for this Hong Kong recipe.  The skin of the fin is removed.  The fin is boiled with a chicken for many hours. The chicken cannot be a rooster or a hen that has produced any or many eggs.

This restaurant in Taipei caters for visiting Japanese tourists.

Soup is served bubbling hot, boiling in a bowl.  Small plates of  1. vegetables  2. a sweet and sour sauce  3. XO sauce are added to the soup in stages as it is being consumed so as to alter and create new tastes.

This restaurant will charge about US $40 for the soup as a dinner which also includes a small-to-medium sized  Chilean abalone in special sauce, plus dessert.

Opposition
Many of the arguments used by China, Japan, Russia and several North African countries to oppose the measure were expected to be recycled by delegates later this week when proposals to tightening regulations on the shark trade are considered.

China and Russia argued that shark populations aren’t suffering. Japan insisted that current measures in place are more than adequate. Developing countries like Libya and Morocco complained that any effort to protect sharks would damage the economies of poor fishing nations and burden them with expensive enforcement requirements.

The Chinese delegation said there was no scientific evidence that the shark’s survival is threatened and CITES was not the right forum to handle the issue. The Chinese would prefer to leave regulation to existing tools like the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization and regional bodies which conservationists argue have failed to crackdown on illegal fishing and even uphold their own modest quotas. (Courtesy: Associated Press).

It looks like a piece of fish and has the texture of crab.  This is Surimi.  Meanwhile a lot of shark meat is being sold to compensate for a world decline in fin fishes.  In other words, sharks are no longer wasted – unless the shark is over a certain length considered too big for handling.  In that case the fishermen decide it’s fate.  Whatever that is, the fins are not removed (unless a fisheries law is about to be broken).